Back To School

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Did you know?

According to an Experian College Graduate Survey conducted in 2016, 58 percent of soon-to-be graduates acknowledged they had a credit card, and 30 percent admitted they had credit card debt. The average debt of the respondents was more than $2,500, a substantial sum considering that much of it is likely consumer debt, and not the so-called "good debt" like car loans or mortgage payments that can help young people establish their credit histories. A report from the Institute of College Access and Success indicated that the average member of the college class of 2015 graduated with $30,100 in student loan debt. Student loans are often repaid over many years, with some repayment schedules extending more than a decade. In addition, as long as students make their payments on time and in full, the amount of interest they will pay if their loans come with fixed rates will remain the same. Students' credit card debt is not the same, and students who can only afford to pay the minimum payments each month will see the amount of interest they're paying grow considerably until the balance is completely paid off. That's one reason why students must learn the difference between consumer debt and student loan debt and how accumulating the former is far more detrimental to students' financial futures than accruing the latter.